Infographics

The infographics published here trace intricate themes essential to a range of global modernist texts. They also offer comparative studies of multiple texts at once, forging new connections between works composed in different languages, cultures, and national contexts.

ON JAMES JOYCE’S “THE DEAD”

The Eight Leafs of Gabriel Conroy’s Personality

The Power of Words

Misconceptions and Their Consequences

How Proudly Should You Wave that Flag?

ON RABINDRANATH TAGORE’S THE POST OFFICE

The Boy Who Made a Difference

A Child’s Dream

A Valuable Cast

A Chance to Live

ON NELLA LARSEN’S PASSING

Conflicted: Irene’s Views of Clare

Passing through Life

Reading into Race

ON EILEEN CHANG’S “LOVE IN A FALLEN CITY”

Two Worlds Collide

Taboos in a Modern City

A Tale of Subdued Power

Uncertainty

Rising Familial Tension

ON JOSEPH CONRAD’S “THE SECRET SHARER”

Alone at Sea

The Duality of Human Nature

Effects from Paranoia

A Life-Changing Encounter

Maturity

ON ERNEST HEMINGWAY’S “THE SNOWS OF KILIMANJARO”

An Intrigue with Death

The Regrets of a Dead Man

All that was Never Written

ON SAMUEL BECKETT’S “WAITING FOR GODOT”

The Never Ending Cycle

What’s the Point of Waiting?

Living in an Endless Cycle

Finding Purpose in Purposelessness

ON JORGE LUIS BORGES’S “THE LIBRARY OF BABEL”

The Improbability of Finding One’s Purpose

LIBRARYOFBABEL.COM

Exploring the Infinite

Constructing Infinity

ON JEAN RHYS’S WIDE SARGASSO SEA

Identity Drowned by Loss

The ‘Mad’ Woman’s House

Together in Isolation

Uncover the Color

Flame to Fury

Rejecting Antoinette

Authority

Gender Matters

COMPARATIVE INFOGRAPHICS
On Passing Wide Sargasso Sea

About the Gray Areas

Identity Crisis

Discrimination Over Nations

On Passing + The Post Office

Racism and Caste-ism

On Wide Sargasso Sea + “Love in a Fallen City”

The Role of Women in a Patriarchal World

Before and After Marriage

On “The Dead” + “The Snows of Kilimanjaro” + Waiting for Godot

Existentialism through Modernism

On “The Dead” + Wilfred Owen’s Poetry

We Don’t All See the Same

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